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8 Tips For Using Kamado Joes Under A Roof

Kamado Joe Under Roof

A Kamado Joe is meant only for outdoor use. Though you could keep it on a patio under a covered pergola to keep it out of the elements. Though as time goes on the ceiling of the covered pergola or canopy structure might start to develop some smoke stains.

If you do need to use your Kamado Joe during rainy weather, it’s best to put up a temporary canopy to keep things like prep and serving platters dry.

If you absolutely need to use it under a roof, you can bring it into your garage and keep it right near the open door of an empty stall.

When you aren’t using your Kamado Joe, it should be covered and left outside.

The cover will prevent rain and snow from getting in the damper vents. With proper care, a Kamado Joe can be kept outside and enjoy a vigorous long life of up to 20 years or more.


Why You Would Want to Leave a Kamado Joe Under a Roof

Like a lot of grills, a Kamado Joe will last longer when they are covered or protected from the elements by being stored under a roof.

Even though they are designed to be very durable, some metal exterior components can suffer some wear and tear if they get rained on a lot. Especially if you like leaving the lower damper open a crack to promote good airflow and prevent interior condensations.


Using a Kamado Joe on a Patio

A patio or similar type of paved surface is one of the best places to keep a heavy Kamado Joe.

Assuming your patio is level, it will give the Kamado Joe the support its girth needs, while still keeping it close enough to the house to use any time you want.


Kamado Canopy

A temporary canopy or a covered pergola can help keep you dry when using your Kamado Joe on a rainy day.

It’s especially handy if you are smoking meat or grilling something with a long cooking time. A canopy over a Kamado Joe can also keep prep platters, serving plates, grill accessories, and seasonings out of the elements.  


Can You Use a Kamado Grill Indoors?

Kamado grills are meant to be used outdoors, and shouldn’t be brought into your home.

Even though they don’t get overly hot, they can still damage interior trim and woodwork. Not to mention introducing a serious amount of smoke to a room when you open the lid.

If you do need to use your Kamado Joe during bad weather, you should put up a temporary canopy or move it under a covered pergola.

In a pinch, you can move it into an empty garage stall, with the garage door open and all gas cans or other flammable items moved far away from it.


Can You Leave a Kamado Joe Outside?

A Kamado Joe can be stored outside without worry about the elements damaging the ceramic exterior finish.

Though you should consider covering it when not in use. It’s best to store your Kamado Joe with the lid latch released, to preserve the life of the gasket, as well as leaving the lower damper and upper vent open a little to promote good airflow.

A cover will keep rain and moisture from invading the interior.  

If your area has harsh winters, you might want to consider storing your Kamado Joe in a garage or garden shed. Though it’s not meant to be used indoors.


How Long Will a Kamado Joe Last If Left Outside?

A Kamado Joe is designed to last for decades outdoors with proper use.

Though storing it under a cover will help keep rain and melting snow from causing corrosion on some of the metal components. In the wintertime, the top vent can sometimes get ice buildup inside if it isn’t covered.


Final Thoughts

A Kamado Joe is an outdoor grill that needs a firm surface, like a patio to support it.

A roof overhead from a portable canopy or a covered pergola is handy for times when you want to grill or smoke meat on a rainy day.

Protecting your Kamado Joe with a waterproof cover when not in use will go a long way toward extending its lifespan out to 20 years or more.

If you absolutely do need to use your Kamado Joe on a rainy day, you shouldn’t bring it indoors.

In a pinch, you can move it into an empty garage stall, and keep it near the open door while moving all flammable things like gas cans far away. Though the safer option is to use a portable canopy.