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7 Things To Know About A Kamado Joe’s Max Temp

7 Things To Know About A Kamado Joe’s Max Temp

Kamado Joe Max Temp

Kamado Joes have great thermal efficiency, which translates into a maximum temperature of 750-degrees or more, while still being able to hold as low as 225 degrees.

Though it certainly is possible to open up the dampers and load the firebox with fast-burning lump charcoal and wood chips to achieve higher temperatures. Though this might not be advisable.

Preheating a Kamado Joe to 500+ degrees usually only takes 10 to 15 minutes.

Though it could take longer if you have the heat deflectors in place.

You can push the temperature of a Kamado Joe up to 750-degrees and beyond, though you run the risk of burning the food and damaging a variety of components.

Pushing a Kamado grill above 750 degrees repeatedly or driving the temperature up to 900 degrees can potentially damage ceramic components in the firebox.

It can also warp the internal stainless steel O-ring or the bands on the lid or the lower grill body. Damage from abusive heating practices might not be covered under Kamado Joe’s warranty policies.


What Is a Kamado Joe’s Max Temp?

Kamado Joe grills are rated to have a maximum temperature range of up to 750 degrees. Though with the lower damper and the upper vent wide open they can theoretically get even hotter than that.

Though this might not be wise, as the ceramic firebox and some of the metal components do have thermal limits. Especially if you try to push the temperature all the way up to 900 degrees.


How Quickly Does a Kamado Joe Get to its Max Temp?

A Kamado Joe can get to 600+ or even as high as 750 degrees in around 15 to 20 minutes.

Though you will need to leave the heat deflectors out of the firebox. The lower damper and the upper vent will need to be wide open and the dome lid needs to be firmly shut for this type of rapid heating.

Jumbo lump charcoal will also burn faster and hotter than briquettes.


Should You Ever Really Be Using the Max Temp on a Kamado Joe?

Pushing a Kamado Joe to the maximum temperature of 750 degrees isn’t really necessary.

Even for cuts of meat that call for high heat searing, like steaks, chops, kabobs, and Japanese yakitori, you really only need a 500-degree flame.

When you force the Kamado Joe to 750 degrees or higher, you’re just increasing the risk of burning the food, rather than searing it.

More importantly, you run the risk of cracking super-heated ceramic components in the lower firebox or warping metal like the stainless steel upper O-ring.

Repeated max heat cooks can potentially cause alignment issues in your bands, which will need to be adjusted to prevent an underbite or overbite with the dome lid.

Also bear in mind that anything damaged by temperatures over 700-degrees might void the warranty. Kamado Joe’s warranty does include language about warranty coverage only being applicable for normal use.

They typically ask for pictures and customer service reps are adept at spotting damage caused by abusive heating practices.


Is It Safe to Cook Foods at a Kamado Joes Max Temp?

While a Kamado Joe was designed to be able to safely heat up to 750-degrees, and possibly higher, it might not be safe to do it all the time.

Repeated max heat cooks can use cracks in the ceramic components of the lower firebox.

It can also start to warp the stainless steel O-ring at the top of the firebox which plays an important role in installing the heat deflectors and grates.

Repeated max heat cooks can also potentially cause alignment issues in your bands.

When this starts to happen the upper lid band, and perhaps the lower band will need to be adjusted to correct the underbite or overbite in the dome lid.


Kamado Joe 900 Degrees

It is theoretically possible to get a Kamado Joe up to 900 degrees. Though it might not be wise for the long-term life of the grill.

Getting a Kamado Joe up to 900 degrees starts with setting a grate in the bottom to create more air space under the charcoal in the lower portion of the firebox above the lower ceramic O-ring.

You then install the multi-piece ceramic firebox on top of that grate.

You might need to put some small balls of heavy-duty aluminum foil behind each ceramic firebox section to get them to match up properly in this slightly higher position.

When you build your fire, you want to use jumbo lump charcoal with a mixture of dry wood chips on top.

Then open your lower damper all the way before lighting.

Once the fire starts, you should close and latch the lid.

Set the upper vent wide open to allow for maximum airflow.

If you want to push the flame beyond the rated 750-degree limit, you can use a small hand fan or bellows to push more fresh air through the lower damper.

When the temperature on the dome thermometer reads 700-degrees, you will need to use an infrared thermometer to get an accurate reading on the grill grates.

Bear in mind that 900-degrees is hotter than the grill is rated to safely burn at. So you could be damaging ceramic components in the firebox while running the risk of warping the bands or the internal stainless steel O-ring.


Final Thoughts

Kamado Joes are rated to have a maximum temperature of 750-degrees and can be pushed to get even hotter than that. Though routinely using maximum heat or driving the heat to as high as 900 degrees is not advisable.

Excessive heating practices come with the very real risk of damaging ceramic components in the firebox.

Maximum temps of 750 degrees or more can potentially warp the internal stainless steel O-ring or the bands on the lid or the lower grill body.

Damage from abusive heating practices might not be covered under Kamado Joe’s warranty policies.

Preheating a Kamado Joe to 500+ degrees will typically only take 10 to 15 minutes without the heat deflectors installed.

Though most of the foods that you want to sear on high heat will do just fine over a 500-degree fire, without the heightened risk of rapid burning that comes at a temperature of 700 degrees or more.