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Weber Smokey Mountain Mold | Causes & Solutions

Weber Smokey Mountain Mold | Causes & Solutions

Sometimes mold can build up in a Weber Smokey Mountain. This should be no cause for alarm however, as it can easily be remedied.

Causes Of Mold In A Weber Smokey Mountain

Mold accrual in a smoker is primarily due to an accumulation of water inside the unit.  This can be caused by:

  • Not opening the vents during storage
  • Leaving water in the water pan
  • Leaving the smoker cover on for extended periods

Mold can form on the ceramic inside of the Weber Smokey mountain whenever moisture and grease are trapped inside. Leaving the vents closed when the unit is not being used can cause moisture to build up inside the smoker and have no way to escape. 

Another culprit is leaving water in the water pan when the unit is not used.  This can be a breeding ground for mold.  The smoker cover is another source  of moisture buildup.  Leaving the unit covered can trap moisture inside causing mold as well as rust.


Mold Prevention Techniques

Fortunately there are ways to deter mold from accumulating inside a smoker.  You can store the unit disassembled which will go a long way to preventing moisture from building up on any of the parts. 

If the unit has to be stored put together however, creating a dry environment will help prevent mold from growing inside it. 

Finding a space that stays dry that can be used to store the smoker when not in use will be the best mold prevention technique. 

Giving the Smokey Mountain a good cleaning after a cooking session will also help remove grease and moisture from accumulating inside. 

For this process though, avoid chemical based cleaners and simply use soap and water.  Make sure to empty the water pan and the charcoal chamber as well as these areas can trap moisture.  After a thorough scrubbing, give the inside a rinse then hand dry the smoker. 


Mold Removal Methods

If you do discover mold inside the smoker though, do not panic as removing it is a relatively straightforward process. 

The first step is to run the smoker empty to kill any mold that is growing inside.  Load the smoker like normal with charcoal, set the vents wide open and let it run as hot as you can get it. 

Once the smoker completes the cooking cycle and cools down, empty the cooking chamber then use a wire brush or pressure washer to attack any areas where mold can be seen in the cooking chamber.  Use the wire brush to scrape the cooking grates, making sure to eliminate any food particles that may be clinging on.  

Next, give the smoker a cleaning with soap and water followed by a rinse and drying.

Is Fire Good Enough To Eliminate Mold, And How Hot Should It Be?

Mold thrives in environments that are damp, dark, and dank.  Fire burns hot and bright so it is a fantastic weapon in the mold fighting arsenal.  Loading up the smoker full of charcoal and letting it burn as hot is it can go should absolutely kill any mold that tries to take up residence inside the Smokey Mountain. 

Opening all the vents on the top and bottom of the smoker should allow it to run at a sustained temperature of 300 degrees or more, which should be plenty hot enough to kill any mold.  Cleaning the smoker as prescribed above after a burnout should have the unit back in top condition and ready to smoke any meat thrown its way.